Last edited by Togor
Tuesday, August 4, 2020 | History

4 edition of Non-sexual hormonal influences on the electrophysiology of the brain found in the catalog.

Non-sexual hormonal influences on the electrophysiology of the brain

papers

  • 387 Want to read
  • 10 Currently reading

Published by MSS Information Corp. in New York .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Neuroendocrinology.,
  • Brain -- Physiology -- Collected works.,
  • Electrophysiology -- Collected works.,
  • Hormones -- Pharmacodynamics -- Collected works.,
  • Hormones -- Physiology -- Collected works.

  • Edition Notes

    Statementby James A. Clemens [and others]
    SeriesMSS" series on the biology of sex
    ContributionsClemens, James A.
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsQP356.4 .N66
    The Physical Object
    Pagination188 p.
    Number of Pages188
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL5045836M
    ISBN 100842272232
    LC Control Number74006074
    OCLC/WorldCa868010

    This book, while interesting, was a bit dry and not quite as accessible as a pop science book ought to be. LeVay managed to keep it from sounding completely like a text book by dropping in a few quips here and there, but on the whole this book wasn't as enjoyable a read as Queer Science, his later book that discussed the history of scientific inquiry into homosexuality/5.   Your Brain on Hormones: How Neuroscience Can Make You a Better Leader Hormones affect us every second of our lives. Our emotional and physical health is dictated by how these hormones interact with the cells in our bodies and our brain.

    Hormones influence behavior by inducing certain changes within the human body, usually with the involvement of the brain. For instance, thyroid hormones do influence neural activity and hence affecting the release of hormones that impact on mood. Sex hormones have strong influences on the brain and nervous system, and they have important roles in brain development and function. For example, estrogen affects both the anatomy and physiology of the part of the brain called the hippocampus.

    Research shows that, in the absence of neural and hormonal influences, the SA node generates action potentials at a frequency of approximately times per minute. However, the resting heart rate is approximately 70 beats per minute, which suggests that. Part 4 provides an overview of the synapse from the time of formation to degeneration under the powerful influence of aging or hormonal decline that leads to severe deficits in cognitive function. Each chapter is illustrated with drawings and images derived from calcium imaging, electron microscopic immunolabeling, or electrophysiology.


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Non-sexual hormonal influences on the electrophysiology of the brain Download PDF EPUB FB2

Genre/Form: Collected Work: Additional Physical Format: Online version: Non-sexual hormonal influences on the electrophysiology of the brain. New York, MSS Information Corp. Title(s): Non-sexual hormonal influences on the electrophysiology of the brain: papers/ by James A.

Clemens, B. Cross, Masazumi Kawakami et al. Country of Publication: United States Publisher: New York: MSS Information Corp., c Genre/Form: Collected Work: Additional Physical Format: Online version: Sexual hormones: influences on the electrophysiology of the brain.

New York, MSS Information Corp. The ontogeny of sex differences in the developing brain occurs through genetic and hormonal influences. Steroid hormone signaling events are involved for many of the sex differences seen in development [1,2], however, it is also evident that genetic contributions provide another important factor in determining brain sexual by: Read the latest chapters of Advances in Molecular and Cell Biology atElsevier’s leading platform of peer-reviewed scholarly literature.

Some sexual dimorphisms, however, are apparent in cerebral cortical structures, implying differences in more complex regulatory behaviors. The development of these differences depends on the early influence of hormones on maturing brain circuits, especially estrogens, an influence that apparently continues to some extent throughout : Dale Purves, George J Augustine, David Fitzpatrick, Lawrence C Katz, Anthony-Samuel LaMantia, James.

Once the differentiation of the sexual organs into male or female is settled, the next. thing that is differentiated is the brain, under the influence, mainly, of sex hormones. such as testosterone, estrogen and progesterone on the developing brain cells and. under the presence of different genes as well [15].

Sex, hormones and the brain Article (PDF Available) in The European Journal of Contraception and Reproductive Health Care 2(4) January with 2, Reads How we measure 'reads'. Hormonal Influences on Sexual Dimorphism. The development of sexual dimorphisms in the central nervous system is ultimately an outcome of genotypic sex.

Genotype normally determines the phenotype of the gonads; and the gonads, in turn, are responsible for producing most of the circulating sex hormones (see Box A).Author: Dale Purves, George J Augustine, David Fitzpatrick, Lawrence C Katz, Anthony-Samuel LaMantia, James.

A Northern California author says he's discovered the missing link that explains the biological source of sexual orientation. While doing research for his recent book, The Whole-Brain Path to. Social stress: effects on hormones, brain and behavior Communication by chemical signals Hormonal and pheromonal effects on the limbic system: implications for reproductive behavior Circadian regulation of endocrine function Mammalian seasonal rhythms: behavior and neuroendocrine substrates Steroids and learning Hormonal effects on memory.

Brain development and function as well as psychiatric traits are influenced by sex hormone levels [5] and genetic factors [2]. For example, expression of the gene BDNF is influenced by estradiol.

Across all these species, early levels of testosterone and hormones produced from testosterone, shape brain development in regions with receptors for these hormones. Because these hormonal influences are written into the structure of the brain, they manifest in behavior across the by: Main content.

Electrophysiology is the study of the electrical properties of biological cells and tissues. It involves measurements of voltage changes or electric currents on a wide variety of scales from single ion channels to whole organs like the heart. The Sexual Brain is a book about brain mechanisms involved in sexual behavior and feelings, and related topics such as sexual orientation, by the neuroscientist Simon LeVay.

The book was praised as a well-written work on science. However, some reviewers pointed out factual errors, and noted that LeVay failed to prove that homosexuality has a biological : Simon LeVay. R.D. Brinton, J.T. Nilsen, in International Encyclopedia of the Social & Behavioral Sciences, Gonadal hormones exert a profound influence on brain development and function throughout the life span.

Discoveries of estrogen and progesterone action on brain functions beyond reproduction has led to a resurgence of interest in these steroids and in their receptors.

In view of the above it was proposed that the increase in brain excitability can be explained by a direct effect of the hormones on diencephalic centers, which regulate brain electrical activity and are known to be related to epileptic phenomena (Streifler and Feldman, ).

This hypothesis was suggested in view of the fact that adrenocortical Cited by: The Cell in Medical Science. Volume 1: The Cell and Its Organelles. The Cell in Medical Science. Volume 2: Cellular Genetics, Development and Cellular Specialization. There are probably many influences, but one may be the level of hormones that your brain was exposed to while developing in utero.

One of the clues that androgens (testosterone-like hormones) influence sexual orientation comes from a disorder called Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia (CAH). Neuroendocrinology is a multidisciplinary subject on the interaction between the brain and endocrine system and the influence of this interaction on the behavior of animals and humans.

This book is designed as an introductory text in neuroendocrinology. It outlines the basics of endocrinology, including the endocrine glands, the pituitary gland, the hypothalamus, and their interactions.5/5(1).

Sexually dimorphic behaviors in mammals can be considered the end result of reciprocal influences among genes, gonadal sex, hormonal sex, organizational and activational effects of hormones on the brain, trophic actions of hormones, learning, and social and other environmental influences.

Most often, in mammals, these aspects of sex are by:   Scientists are now uncovering increasing evidence that the brain not only responds to hormones produced by the reproductive system, but that these hormones—the so-called “female hormones,” estrogen and progestin, and the “male” androgens.Drugs, Addiction, and the Brain explores the molecular, cellular, and neurocircuitry systems in the brain that are responsible for drug addiction.

Common neurobiological elements are emphasized that provide novel insights into how the brain mediates the acute rewarding effects of drugs of abuse and how it changes during the transition from initial drug use to compulsive drug use and by: